Hort

Apr 202017
 

Acacia verticillata in flower on the front glasshouse border. A mass of mini citrus yellow bottle brushes. The flowers are a mass of densely packed stamens. The sharp phyllodes are evergreen and borne in whorls around the stem. A native to South Australia where it grows as a small tree or multi-stemmed shrub.

Acacia verticillata

Acacia verticillata

Acacia verticillata

Acacia verticillata

 

 

 

 

 

(phyllode, a wing or growth on any part of a plant which functions as a leaf.)

Apr 112017
 

Pulsatilla turczaninovii, a plant from  seed collected on the Russian Altay where it grew on the banks of the River Bashkaus. Sown and grown and now flowering on the tufa outcrop in front of the alpine house. Found growing at low altitude, 426m, in association with Geranium and Iris; also woody flora, Rhododendron, Betula and Pinus. Leaves well divided the flowers blue/violet in colour. A perennial forming a tufted clump from which a prolific number of flower buds emerge.

Pulsatilla turczaninovii

Pulsatilla turczaninovii

Pulsatilla turczaninovii

Pulsatilla turczaninovii

Apr 052017
 

A selection of the Magnolia species and cultivars are in full flower at RBGE. These magnificent trees are at their best when the sun shines and the air is still. Overnight frost combined with early sun and gales are the weather conditions that bring these showy flowers to an early and untimely end. Best grown in sheltered deciduous open woodland but through the Edinburgh suburbs many fine specimens are planted in open situations and are equally as vigorous in growth and prolific in flower. A walk through the copse will reveal many fine specimens from western and central China thriving in our climate. The attached image is of M. sprengeri var. elongata, a variety with larger tepals than the species.

Magnolia sprengeri var. elongata

Magnolia sprengeri var. elongata

Mar 232017
 

Look out for Rhododendron siderophyllum planted at the bottom of the Chinese hillside.  A small plant with evergreen leaves that give off an aromatic smell when touched or following a rainstorm. Flowers are a pink bud opening pink and fading to white. The tubular corolla opens out to spread petals and stamens of uneven length. A change from the large trusses of blooms often associated with the genus Rhododendron at this time of year.  Collected on hillsides near Kunming, Yunnan, China at 2300m.

Rhododendron siderophyllum

Rhododendron siderophyllum

Rhododendron siderophyllum

Rhododendron siderophyllum

Mar 212017
 

A first flowering at RBGE for Iris zaprjagajewii one of the dwarf Juno Iris. Collected by members of the alpine and rock garden team on an expedition to Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region of Tajikistan. A white flowered species with delicate black pencil like lines and a yellow stripe on the falls.  By way of contrast, Iris popovii is as colourful and showy an Iris as you will find in any of the sections of the genus. Also in the Juno section this plant is again found in the Pamir mountain range at 2400m, endemic to one area of the mountains where it is scarce. The flower is predominantly a light purple shade through the petals with the addition of a bright orange crest on the falls which resembles a cockerel’s comb. The tips of the falls terminating with a splash of red.

Iris popovii

Iris popovii

Iris zaprjagjewii

Iris zaprjagjewii

Mar 142017
 

A fine specimen is Rhododendron hunnewellianum, planted by the laundry building near Inverleith House.  Best seen from the pathway and lawn nearby as it is a top heavy plant, towering six meters with a mass of blooms covering its evergreen canopy. The flower trusses open from a light pink to a delicate pink/white. The inner side of the upper petals speckled a darker pink. Prominent flower parts with the style extending out to the parameter of the petals. It was introduced from SW China by Earnest Wilson in 1908. The species name hunnewellianum is after Horatio Hollis Hunnewell and his family, in true American fashion, railroad financier and amateur botanist.

Rhododendron hunnewellianum ssp. hunewellianum

Rhododendron hunnewellianum ssp. hunewellianum

Rhododendron hunnewellianum ssp. hunewellianum

Rhododendron hunnewellianum ssp. hunewellianum

Mar 072017
 

Flowering in many gardens is Prunus cerasifera or one of its many forms. A welcome reminder that spring is arriving. A native to the Caucasus and now found growing in many gardens throughout the country. Flower colour is variable from white through pink to purple. This variability is also seen in the foliage, which colours depending on cultivar from green to a dark purple; hence the name “Purple Plum”. The plant in the Garden is a wide headed specimen found growing in the south west corner.

Prunus cerasifera 'Diversifolia'

Prunus cerasifera ‘Diversifolia’

Prunus cerasifera 'Diversifolia'

Prunus cerasifera ‘Diversifolia’

Mar 012017
 
Galanthus nivalis 'Sandersii'

A lot of plants have caught my eye during the past decade while compiling a weekly profile on a seasonal plant of interest. Below are the consistently reliable ones. These are the plants that whatever the seasonal weather, will flower, produce fruit or give exceptional foliage interest. These are the ten to fill your garden with and appreciate for their resilience and growth.

January: Vinca difformis – Myriad white flowers covering a tight tangle of evergreen shoots

February: Galanthus spp. and cultivars, carpets of Snowdrops through borders and woodland.

An image is attached of G. nivalis ‘Sandersii’ growing in the frames within the alpine yard. The Sandersii group of Snowdrops are known for their yellow ovary and yellow tips to the inner tepals. This collection of bulbs is particularly fine, the colouration resembling free range egg yolk.

March: Iris histrioides – Plant tightly and appreciate the vivid blue of these flowers

April: Magnolia campbellii and the cultivar ‘Charles Raffill’ – Superb trees covered in impressive pink blooms

May: Syringa x persica – Scent and compact form make this a choice specimen

June: The deciduous Azaleas – Select a cultivar that suits your colour scheme

July: Lilium formosana var. pricei – compact, impressive flower trumpet and a heady fragrance

August: Desfontainia spinosa – A Chilean native with hanging tubular red and yellow flowers

September: Anemone x hybrid – A classic cottage garden favorite

October: Cimicifuga simplex- Long musty scented spikes of starry shaped white flowers

November: Ginkgo biloba – Golden yellow foliage covers the tree, dropping as a golden carpet

December: Helleborus foetidus – An evergreen perennial providing flower on the shortest day.

So to planting, there is always room in the garden for new planting. We are now at the start of a fresh growing season. The garden centres are filling with a wide array of plants in prime condition. Better still, visit a nursery and talk to the growers, don’t be tempted by short term planting it is too early in the season for that. Look at woody material; shrubs and trees. Make a wise selection and think of the decades of pleasure a £30 – £40 investment will give both you and your neighborhood. Don’t balk at the price, use your wealth to support our industry, this is an investment in your garden, our environment.

Prepare the soil well, incorporate organic matter and remove any large stones. For container grown plants, remove the pot and roughen up the edges and base of the compost root ball. This helps the new roots grow out into the border soil. Set the plant in the planting hole so that the top of the compost root ball is lightly covered with soil when you back fill. Firm and grade the soil in the border to a finished level.

Water gently, flicking some water over the shoots, leaves and stems to freshen up the plant. After all, it has been on a journey.

In the first year water all new plantings during dry spells and keep competing vegetation clear from the base of and around the plant.

Galanthus nivalis 'Sandersii'

Galanthus nivalis ‘Sandersii’

Galanthus nivalis 'Sandersii'

Galanthus nivalis ‘Sandersii’

Feb 222017
 

A good selection of young plants of Bergenia pacifica from a sowing in 2015 are flowering for the first time in the nursery. From the attached image can be seen the development of the flower bud and growth leading to a succession of the plants flowering. The flower spike holds a selection of flowers in the terminal cyme that are a welcome warm pink in the last days of winter. A heavy bearer of nectar that can be observed as droplets on the inner surfaces of the petals. A rhizomatous evergreen perennial with rounded foliage, deepening red as temperatures drop through the winter.  Native to east Russia and Siberia where it is found in damp woodland and open meadows, this plant is ideal grouped in semi shade growing in moist border soil.

Bergenia pacifica

Bergenia pacifica

Bergenia pacifica

Bergenia pacifica

Feb 142017
 

Muscari azureum has sent up its instantly recognisable inverted cone of azure blue flowers. Native to Turkey this is a bulb that appreciates good drainage and a sunny aspect and will naturalise through borders. Just look along the alpine wall later in the year, it is full of M. azureum naturalised in this free draining sun baked environment. The flowers within the raceme are mainly fertile and a minority, paler in colour are sterile.

Muscari azureum

Muscari azureum