Mar 222017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, Fanni Barocsi and Georgina Hill, University of Edinburgh students

We met Chelsea Marshall on a sun filled morning at the Summerhall Café to discuss her views on Food Security in Scotland. She is bright and cheerful, with a wealth of knowledge that we were grateful to tap into.

With a background in social justice and children’s rights, Chelsea has very comprehensive and compelling views on the issue of Food Security. In her opinion, Food Security can be a very broad concept and we need to be precise about its definition.

‘It matters how people engage in the conversation’ she said. It also matters what specific terms are used when describing nutritious food. When speaking with children about Food Security, she mentioned that the term ‘healthy food’ is sometimes avoided all together, because children do not associate the term ‘healthy’ with something they want to eat. Instead children might be asked what foods will help them grow big and strong. In general, people do not want to be told what to eat, and making sure people are aware of what makes a healthy meal is not enough to ensure they eat healthily. Continue reading »

Mar 202017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, University of Edinburgh student

Some weeks ago, we wrote about the Permanent Global Summertime and the impression that supermarkets give us that all fruits and vegetables are available year round. The article pointed out some of the food security risks that arise from relying on other countries for access to food (especially fruits and vegetables).

Sutherland kale is a tradditional Scottish brassica that could be grown commercially to supply local seasonal produce.

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Mar 202017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, Fanni Barocsi and Georgina Hill, University of Edinburgh students

Dr. Wendy Wrieden is a member of the Food Security Advisory Group working on the “Big Picnic” project at the Botanic Garden. She is friendly and chatty with a huge amount of research experience, and our discussion flowed for almost an hour! Her first degree was actually in Botany but she then did a PhD in Food Science and over the last 15 years has been researching the Scottish Diet, work funded by Food Standards Scotland, the public-sector food body for Scotland. She enjoys working with people and studying our relationships with food.

Wendy cooking a cashew nut curry.

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Mar 142017
 

 

 

On Thursday 2nd March the Thought for Food participants gathered at the Botanic Cottage for lunch and to discuss the next steps of the project. Soup was made from vegetables growing in the Garden and Sean produced some very tasty cheese scones. After a satisfying lunch the group got down to work.

Sean shows off the cheese scones made with Botanics flour.

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Mar 032017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, Fanni Barocsi and Georgina Hill, University of Edinburgh students

Ben is kind, talkative and passionate about growing food. He says he has been interested in knowing how to grow his own food since his teens, and that interest led him to becoming a Community Gardener of the Botanics.

Ben in the Market Garden where produce for the Garden’s catering outlets is grown.

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Mar 012017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, Fanni Barocsi and Georgina Hill, University of Edinburgh students

Andy’s passion for plants is clear. What he enjoys most about his job is helping people to get closer to the natural world. He points out that most of us think about the natural world in terms of the diversity of animals that exist. But we forget about the extraordinary diversity of plants, the primary producers that form the basis of our ecosystems.

Andy discussing food (his favourite subject) with Fanni and Cristina in the Botanic Cottage kitchen.

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Feb 212017
 

 

 

Blog by Cristina Romero Rios, University of Edinburgh student

Have you ever asked yourself where the bananas that you eat come from? Have you wondered the same about tomatoes, lemons, peppers, asparagus, or for that matter any of the fresh food you eat?

Map showing the source countries of UK fruit and vegetables.

The UK relies on many other countries to supply the fruits and vegetables people eat. If we talk about food security, the UK is highly dependent on foreign imports. At present the UK imports 50% of its vegetable needs and an incredible 90% of its fruit needs. This global supply system can cause problems in the UK if something happens in the source countries. Continue reading »

Feb 212017
 

 

 

Blog by Georgina Hill, University of Edinburgh student

Neighbourhoods do not always have easy access to fresh produce.

For some, accessing fresh, nutritious food can be a challenge. Fruit and veg can be hard to transport and relatively expensive. At the same time, tonnes of fresh produce go to waste every year.

A possible solution: ‘Community Fridges’. People donate fresh food that they would otherwise throw away, and others are free to take what they need. The concept has had success in Germany and Spain. Exciting pilot projects are happening right now in the UK.

So, could we see community fridges in Scotland? Continue reading »

Feb 212017
 

 

 

Blog by Fanni Barocsi, University of Edinburgh student

Charities around Scotland and other parts of the world play a vital role regarding food security in local communities. Here I provide an overview of the many organizations and charities committed to helping promote food security and sustainability in Scotland. Nourish Scotland works hard to help make nutritious food accessible. Love Food Hate Waste is devoted to raising awareness about the necessity of reducing food waste, while the Pilton Community Health Project is dedicated to ensuring that the local community is healthy. Continue reading »

Feb 092017
 

 

 

Gigi with freshly harvested produce.

As placement students from the University of Edinburgh at the Royal Botanic Gardens, our first day was far from conventional. Cristina was “amazed and entranced by the beauty, different colours, sounds and smells” of the gardens. We headed towards the oldest… but newest building in the Gardens, the Botanic Cottage. It travelled, brick by brick from its original site on Leith Walk to become a hub for community engagement at the Gardens.

Food and food security is currently a hot topic for the Royal Botanic Garden as they are part of the Big Picnic project. We took a tour around the Edible Garden and collected ingredients for our huge pot of soup to feed the group. For Gigi, growing up in Hong Kong, the vegetable garden was “a new experience”. Similarly, Cristina “laughed inside because it is very obvious, but sometimes we forget that food comes from nature, just like the trees in a forest.” Continue reading »