Sophie Williams

Exhibition launched!

 Exhibitions, Other News  Comments Off on Exhibition launched!
Jun 172013
 

Last Thursday we had an excellent launch of the ‘Moving forward from ash dieback project’ at the Edinburgh Botanics. Over 40 people attended, with representatives from Scottish Government, all the artists involved with the project and representatives from the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group (STHAG).

Edinburgh Botanics Director of Science Pete Hollingsworth (centre) shows off the new ash dieback exhibit to the chair of the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group, David Henderson-Howart (left) and Phil Balls (right), Scottish Government (RESAS).

RBGE Director of Science Pete Hollingsworth (centre) shows off the new ash dieback exhibit to the chair of the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group, David Henderson-Howart (left) and Phil Balls (right), Scottish Government (RESAS).

During the event we heard from Hugh Clayden (Forestry Commission) about the current status of ash dieback in Scotland. He highlighted the fact that although research in the UK is at an early stage, it is now felt that eradication is no longer thought possible. Natural resistance of ash is expected to be in the region of 1-5% and although spores only live for a few days but can be dispersed tens of kilometres. Tim Hall (Woodland Trust Scotland) then gave us a personal reflection on ash dieback and highlighted how this disease will impact us all; as parents, children, scientists and general lovers of the Scottoish landscape. To close the meeting, Ken Cockburn gave an evocative reading of ‘The Ash Grove’, his poem commissioned by the Edinburgh Botanics for this project.

 

Part of this project is an exhibit, which is now touring around Scotland. This aims is to raise the awareness about the ash dieback fungus and the likely efforts required to help manage the disease. Find out where your nearest venue is and if you haven’t already, watch our animation about ash dieback!

Written by Corinne Baxter and Sophie Williams

Moving forward from ash dieback

 Communities, Other News, Science  Comments Off on Moving forward from ash dieback
May 172013
 

Disease is a normal part of nature. But in recent years there has been a considerable increase in the number of new pests and diseases affecting Scottish trees. It was the recent arrival of a fungus known as Chalara, or ash dieback, that caught the public attention. Over 10 million ash trees in Scotland, and the wildlife that depends on them, are vulnerable to this disease. Listen to our podcasts and watch the beautiful animation to find out how ash dieback will impact Scotland.

Animation

Follow Robert the redstart through the wind swept ash woods in this stunning short animation.

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Apr 302013
 

Resilience noun [mass noun]
1 the ability of a substance or object to spring back into shape; elasticity
2 the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness
[Oxford English Dictionary 2012]

How resilient are the woodlands in Scotland? I like to think they are pretty tough, able to withstand the hardest of times and bounce back. The ancient woodlands of Scotland, such as Rassal Ash wood on the west coast, have endured centuries of change. But the tree health project I have recently been coordinating has started to make me think our trees are more vulnerable than they may first appear. Continue reading »