Category: Science Page 1 of 17

Looking for Prumnopitys andina in gardens around the world

Martin Gardner (@RBGE_ICCP ) is looking for cultivated trees of the threatened Chilean Plum Yew – Prumnopitys andina  If you are growing Prumnopitys andina or know of it growing in cultivation…

A violet for Walt

The Shawnee National Forest skirts the midwestern town of Carbondale, which is home to one of the campuses of Southern Illinois University. It’s also one of the prettiest…

A visit to the Californian type locality for the hornwort Phaeoceros proskaueri

One of North America’s endemic hornworts, Phaeoceros proskaueri Stotler, Crand.-Stotl. & W.T.Doyle [also known as Paraphymatoceros proskaueri (Stotler, Crand.-Stotl. & W.T.Doyle) J.C.Villarreal & Cargill] was described from plants collected in the Monterey Bay…

An expedition to Perthshire to rescue the rare and endangered Polygonatum verticillatum

Polygonatum verticillatum (also known as Whorled Solomon’s Seal) is a rare and endangered perennial plant of steep sided wooded gorges; now only found at nine locations in the…

Project Soothe Exhibition Report

We have finished pulling together the results from the Project Soothe Exhibition that we held here at RBGE in September and October last year. If you are one…

Plant destroyers in action

Visitors to the gardens will be familiar with the foot baths at all entrances. These foot baths are just one of the measures we take to protect our…

Complex thalloid Asterella lateralis from Panama’s Volcano

During a family holiday to Santiago, Panama in June/July 2011, we snuck in a short bryologising trip, first heading west along the Pan-American Highway, then north, to the…

Snowbird, Utah – Marchantia (Preissia) quadrata from the Rockies

The Botany 2004 meeting was in Snowbird, Utah – a chance to see a different part of the United States (and, of course, to present our research to…

Gyrothyra underwoodiana from Vancouver Island

In April 2004, I flew north from Illinois to met up with a botanical friend, Dr Zoe Badcock. Our meeting point was Vancouver, British Columbia; from there we…

The plants of our lives

There’s something quite melancholy about going back through all the little paper packets of voucher specimens, remembering who and where you were when you collected them, and thinking…

Bryological holiday jobs

The Science building at the Botanics closes down between Christmas and New Year, so any last bits of work for the year have to be packed up and…

Notes on the complex thalloid liverwort genus Plagiochasma

Now that we have six wild-collected accessions of Plagiochasma currently growing on public display in the RBGE Arid House, from China, the US (Texas) and Saudi Arabia, I’ve…

The grass herbarium of General William Munro (1818–1880)

Scattered throughout the herbarium cabinets of Gramineae at Edinburgh are many sheets from the herbarium of the distinguished soldier and agrostologist William Munro, bearing a printed label ‘from…

A diversity of forms….. but how do you tell them apart?

To understand giant panda diet you need to understand bamboos and there are many types of bamboos in their habitat. Giant pandas seems to know which is best…

How interconnected are you with nature?

During the recent Project Soothe Exhibition we asked visitors a simple question: How interconnected are you with nature? Please tick the picture below which best describes your relationship with…

Mikania micrantha: The Forest Killer Invading Nepal a Mile-a-Minute

We just published “Mikania micrantha: its status and impact on people and wildlife in Nepal” in a new book, Invasive Alien Plants: Impact on Development and Options for Management,…

Understanding the Caatinga, Brazil

This week’s Science Club talk was given by Ph.D. student Moabe Ferreira Fernandes. His research focuses on understanding diversity and evolutionary patterns within Brazilian Caatinga. The Caatinga is…

Scots “Father of Nepali Botany” to Feature on BBC Nepali Service

Two hundred years ago a new chapter of British-Nepali relations was beginning and one of the first Western scientists to be able to explore Nepal was the Scottish…

Searching for bamboo and giant panda…..poo…..

On a mountain in China a giant panda spends hours sitting eating bamboo but there is no time for a scientist to sit when you are trying to…

Mini moss “trees” from New Zealand

I’m just back from field work in New Zealand with Yoan Coudert, a French CNRS funded researcher based at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Lyon. A major objective…