Category: SciencePage 1 of 31

Latest science blog posts from the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Towards 3 million specimens: Orchidaceae

The following blog was written by Iain Ratter, a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

A tale of two elms

A new chapter in the 800 year relationship between the people of the Highland village of Beauly and a remarkable wych elm began on Monday 29 April 2024…

Towards 3 million specimens: Annonaceae

The following blog was written by Chris Knowles, a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

My RBGE Apprenticeship: Glasshouse Rotation – Patricia Berakova

As part of my apprenticeship at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, I have been working for a 13-week period with each of the different horticultural teams, learning as…

Exploring Greville’s Botanical Illustrations

The following blog was written by Connie Ma, a placement student in the Herbarium. As part of my MSc History of Art, Theory and Display programme at the…

Last Ent set to repopulate Glen Affric

Sometimes individual trees attain what might be called celebrity status. They become widely known for some particular quality or association. This often relates to historical figures and events…

Towards 3 million specimens: Euphorbiaceae

The following blog was written by Linde Hess a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

The unique plant biodiversity of the Central African bemba forests

Deep in the forests of the Congo Basin there is a species of tree, Gilbertiodendron dewevrei, which is doing something truly remarkable. In these hotspots of biodiversity, where…

Elm blossom

If you have ever appreciated elms blooming then you are more observant than most. I don’t mean the splashes of bright green we see in April before most…

Towards 3 million specimens: This lizard’s tail has been snapped before…

The following blog was written by Chris Knowles a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

Restoring a fern wiped out by collectors and botanists

Oblong woodsia (Woodsia ilvensis), a small, rare mountain fern, was virtually wiped out in the Moffat Hills by commercial collectors responding to the Victorian craze for ferns –…

Growing Connections: Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh and The National Botanic Gardens of Ireland.

The sharing of plants between botanic gardens has long been an essential tool in the cultivation and display of the world’s rare and threatened flora. The plants generously…

Towards 3 million specimens: Primula vulgaris: A Herald of Spring

The following blog was written by Courtney Kemnitz a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

Towards 3 million specimens: Digitising Plantaginaceae

The following blog was written by Becky Camfield a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

Towards 3 million specimens: Digitising Phyllanthaceae

The following blog was written by Linde Hess a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

Seedlings of hope

On Thursday 25 January 2024, 43 people gathered at the Little Assynt Tree Nursery, near Lochinver, making a hopeful start to the year by planting elm trees. Elms…

Common is rare and rare is common

A study published in the journal Nature led by colleagues at University College London using data generated by hundreds of scientists from around the world including at RBGE…

Towards 3 million specimens: Digitising Amaryllidaceae & Alliaceae

The following blog was written by Iain Ratter a digitiser in the Herbarium. Since 2021 we have increased our digitisation capacity with the goal of getting to 1…

Redefining Aneura maxima and other Pellia-like Aneura

It seems that not only are the North American Aneura sharpii, the east Asian Aneura pellioides and the south-east Asian Aneura maxima all distinct species, but there are also two Pellia-like Aneura species in Europe.

Tidying up in Aneura

We have chosen a lectoype for Riccardia fuscovirens Lindb. (i.e., a type specimen that is chosen after a name has been published, but from the original specimens or illustrations that the author of the name would have been influenced by when they were first recognizing the taxon)