Jun 172013
 

Last Thursday we had an excellent launch of the ‘Moving forward from ash dieback project’ at the Edinburgh Botanics. Over 40 people attended, with representatives from Scottish Government, all the artists involved with the project and representatives from the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group (STHAG).

Edinburgh Botanics Director of Science Pete Hollingsworth (centre) shows off the new ash dieback exhibit to the chair of the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group, David Henderson-Howart (left) and Phil Balls (right), Scottish Government (RESAS).

RBGE Director of Science Pete Hollingsworth (centre) shows off the new ash dieback exhibit to the chair of the Scottish Tree Health Advisory Group, David Henderson-Howart (left) and Phil Balls (right), Scottish Government (RESAS).

During the event we heard from Hugh Clayden (Forestry Commission) about the current status of ash dieback in Scotland. He highlighted the fact that although research in the UK is at an early stage, it is now felt that eradication is no longer thought possible. Natural resistance of ash is expected to be in the region of 1-5% and although spores only live for a few days but can be dispersed tens of kilometres. Tim Hall (Woodland Trust Scotland) then gave us a personal reflection on ash dieback and highlighted how this disease will impact us all; as parents, children, scientists and general lovers of the Scottoish landscape. To close the meeting, Ken Cockburn gave an evocative reading of ‘The Ash Grove’, his poem commissioned by the Edinburgh Botanics for this project.

 

Part of this project is an exhibit, which is now touring around Scotland. This aims is to raise the awareness about the ash dieback fungus and the likely efforts required to help manage the disease. Find out where your nearest venue is and if you haven’t already, watch our animation about ash dieback!

Written by Corinne Baxter and Sophie Williams

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.