Category: HorticulturePage 3 of 52

Parassiti e malattie

Pests and Disease in Italy The scrutiny of the plant world has recently fallen upon Italy due to a vicious disease which has destroyed many ancient olive groves….

Summer Roses

The much loved rose is by nature a flower of soft colours ranging from pale creams and lemons to peaches, pinks and deeper reds and crimson. For centuries…

Paeonia lutea

Folded foliage and weighty limbs

Following the prolonged dry period, the rain that we are experiencing now is a welcome shock to plants. The Paeonia lutea reacted to the additional weight of this…

Clematis campaniflora

Two Clematis

In an open aspect to the south of the rock garden two Clematis are flowering. Clematis ternifolia, a vigorous grower with lightly scented white star like flowers bearing…

The colourful Herbaceous Border

The Herbaceous Border at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is 165m long and is backed by one of Britain’s finest beech hedges. The border is currently a riot…

Crocosmia masoniorum

The hot end of the border

The herbaceous border has a group of plants throwing out hot colours. Revelling in the long hot, dry days, this is peak Monarda season. Complementing the Monarda ‘Jacob…

What are ‘Art Forms’ or ‘Macro/ bonsai’ ?

What are ‘Art Forms’ or ‘Macro/ bonsai’ ? They are large plants – predominantly conifers like Pine and Ilex crenata – which have been trained to look like large…

‘Have you seen the octopus?’

‘Hai visto il polpo?’ *Waves arms to impersonate octopus* ‘Its warm today isn’t it mate’ I said while flapping my arms back to him My current boss called…

Unusual fern Lepisorus thunbergianus

I spotted this unusual fern on a shipment that had come to Vannucci from Japan. The 8-20cm long plants were clinging to the trunk and underside of branches…

100th birthday for a Himalayan Wild Pear collected by George Forrest

On the 18th July 2018 we celebrate the 100th birthday of the Pyrus pashia tree growing on the Pyrus lawn.

Mespilus germanica 14 Jun

Following Storm Hector

A casualty of Storm Hector was the loss of our mature Medlar, Mespilus germanica. The large canopy was like a sail gusting in the full force of the…

The Big Botanics BioBlitz and the 1000th Species

A damselfly basking in the sun photographed Philip Gillespie. One of the ways the garden has already celebrated nature and biodiversity this year was to hold the Big…

Tropaeolum polyphyllum

Diminutive and demonstrative

On the alpine wall baking in the June heat is Jasminum parkeri. With the familiar Jasmine shaped flowers this is a ground hugging evergreen shrub native to northern…

Straggly with style

Two herbaceous perennials that originate in North America are in flower at the garden. The Aquilegia was collected as seed in British Columbia growing in full sun on…

Meconopsis ‘Hensol Violet’ by Sam Stapleton

The first day I arrived in Logan Botanic Gardens I was stunned by the beauty of Meconopsis ‘Slieve Donard’, a blue sky-like flower, a purity you could only…

The Dalmatian Laburnum – a first flowering at Logan by Chris Parsons

The walled garden at Logan, provides extra protection for many exotic shrubs and climbers, in what is already a benign climate thanks to the gulf stream. One such…

Arisaemas by Nuala Godfrey

Arisaemas are a genus comprising more than 200 species, commonly known as Jack-in-the-pulpits or cobra lilies. They are tuberous perennials, live for around 20 years, and are usually…

Aristolochia griffithii – a curious climber flowers at Logan Botanic Garden by Katy Merrington

Surreptitiously snaking up the north-facing wall of Logan’s walled garden, this intriguing climber has a fascinating flower, which unfolds its pale exterior to reveal a blood red throat….

Polylepis australis by Vida Svahnstrom

As an intern at Logan, visitors often ask me questions about the garden while I’m working in the beds. One of the plants I am most frequently asked…

A very fine tree

Pterostyrax hispida is a choice tree native to shaded edges of forests in China and Japan. Growing at RBGE in the F beds it is now in full…