Category: Edible Gardening ProjectPage 4 of 7

Tomatillos in the Edible Garden

As the cold draws in we’ve started to think about what to grow next year in the garden. We like to select a few of the more unusual…

Collecting Autumn Leaves to make Leaf mould

We are enjoying the autumn colour here at the botanic gardens but the leaves are now falling thick and fast. We do not want to miss out on…

Really Wild Veg – Taste, productivity and disease results

By domesticating wild plants to create our familiar crops we have selected desirable traits like disease resistance, yield and flavour. The Really Wild Veg project has been examining…

Botanic gardens conserve crop diversity too

The importance of conserving crop genetic resources, including the species regarded as Crop Wild Relatives (CWRs), is a subject that has featured quite a bit in this blog…

Really Wild Veg – September 17 Update

Now that harvest is a major activity in the Demonstration Garden the final crops in the Really Wild Veg project are approaching maturity. This project has been growing…

10 ways to eat courgette

Here are some tasty ideas to help you deal with your courgette glut.   1. Stuffed Baked in the oven with a rice, cous cous or bulger wheat…

Stringing onions

The best way of storing onions is using the traditional string method.               Onions must be dried first if they are to…

Pruning raspberries

Raspberries, one of the tastiest soft fruit, grow very well in Scotland. Many of the commercial varieties have been bred by the James Hutton Institute (formerly Scottish Crop…

Time to sow winter salads

The dark days of winter do not mean an end to a supply of fresh nutritious home grown greens. There are a range of salad plants that can…

Chicago Botanic Garden; Green Youth Farm

I’ve been in the privileged position to spend the last week with Chicago Botanic Garden’s Green Youth Farm Programme. There are a handful of these farms located around…

Really Wild Veg – August 5 Update

‘Really Wild Veg’ is a vegetable growing trial run by the Edible Gardening Project and four other community gardens – Girvan Community Garden, Good for Ewe, Whitmuir Organics…

Growing Chard for Winter

Chard is a great autumn, winter and spring crop. Multi coloured varieties such as ‘Rainbow Chard’ look fantastic and are as valuable as an ornamental plant as an…

Really Wild Veg – June 11 Update

This summer the Edible Gardening Project at the Botanics is working with four community gardens across Scotland to grow three wild plants that have given rise to familiar…

Successful Watering

Good weather this week has meant that everything in the Edible Garden is growing well. We have harvested our first peas of the year from the polytunnel. Fine…

Watch Out! Gooseberry Sawfly is About!

At this time of year gooseberry sawfly larvae can rapidly strip the leaves off your gooseberry bush. The best form of defence is vigilance. Regularly inspect your plants…

Don’t Miss the Apple Blossom

The apple, pear and cherry trees in the new fruit garden are in full bloom at the moment and look delightful. This year we have started to record…

Wildlife-friendly Edible Gardening

This week is Scotland’s Nature Festival, a celebration of Scotland’s wildlife and landscapes. Growing fruit and vegetables can sometimes feel like a battle against nature. There are hundreds…

Really Wild Vegetables

This summer we’ll be investigating the wild relatives of some of our most familiar vegetables with our ‘Really Wild Vegetable’ trial (as part of the Talking Science Project). All crops have…

What happens to all the veg from the Edible Garden?

The Edible Garden at the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh is carefully tended by a team of dedicated volunteers. In reward for their endeavours the volunteers are able to…

Want to grow fruit and veg but don’t have a garden?

Growing fruit and vegetables is an immensely rewarding and popular activity. The average waiting time for an allotment in Edinburgh is 4 ½ years with some people waiting…