Tag: biodiversityPage 2 of 2

Botanics Sparrowhawks – Autumn Action

Although now well past the breeding season if you are lucky you may be treated to a close encounter with one of the sparrowhawks in the garden. They…

Where the Tropics meet the Arctic – Scotland

Some of the most remote and beautiful wilderness landscapes in Scotland are in the extreme north-west, in Sutherland, so-called from the Vikings who regarded it as the south…

Botanics Sparrowhawks – Latest Observations

As with the observation of any wild creatures, observing sparrowhawks requires a lot of patience and often the luck of being in the right place at the right…

Botanics Sparrowhawks – Yardstick of Success

Now that the breeding season is coming to a close it seems a good time to pause to reflect on the year so far.  And what a year!…

Botanics Sparrowhawks – What’s that noise?

Welcome back to the Botanics Sparrowhawk blog. No photos this time I’m sorry to say. My camera is just not up to the job although I got quite…

Botanics Sparrowhawks – Keeping Track

Since the last post I have kindly been provided with further pictures from the ringing when Will Hinchliffe took the photo he posted on Twitter. Peter Wilson, also…

Botanics Sparrowhawks – Sparrowhawks and Trees

Welcome to this instalment of the Botanics Sparrowhawks blog.  The feathers above were found below one of the nests and Hugh Coventry, an expert on sparrowhawks who regularly…

Botanics Sparrowhawks

Over the past four years I have been very fortunate to have been able to observe the activities of the sparrowhawks (Gaelic: speireag) in the garden.  These beautiful…

In search of rust

Small orange/brown pustules on the leaves of plants could be a sign of infection by a rust fungus. James Iremonger, Heriot Watt University Student, will be searching Edinburgh…

Adapting to climate change

In May, Scotland published its first Scottish Climate Change Adaptation Programme –  a set of actions to increase Scotland’s resilience to the impacts of a changing climate. RBGE…

Moth trapping in the Garden

Thanks to the enthusiasm of James and Thomas from the local Developing Ecological Surveying Skills (DESS) team at the SWT office near the Garden there is now a…

Timber buildings reveal lost world of lichen species

Lichens are a specialised group of fungi that are useful indicators of the state of the environment. The loss of various species sensitive to air pollution created by…

The Amazon, the Andes and the Himalaya. 2nd year PhD posters

As part of a PhD programme in the School of Biological Sciences at Edinburgh University students are expected to create and present a poster at the end of their 2nd…

Plants & pollinators

According to Horticulture Week, one-third of world food production and 87.5% of all flowering plant species on Earth depend on pollinators. Albert Einstein is credited with saying, “If…

Wilderness areas

Why not create a wilderness area in your own garden? For information see these two publications by PLANTLIFE: Grow Wild – Native flowers  in your garden and Create…

Soprano Soars at Edinburgh Botanics

Local bat experts released a Soprano Pipistrelle bat, Pipistrellus pygmaeus, in the Garden on Saturday 11th May. The bat had been discovered by Robert Unwin on 12th April….

Wildlife in the vegetable garden

It has been a week for wildlife in the vegetable plots. We like to encourage the birds and beasties as much as possible. Gardens are very important habitats…

Going green in the edible garden

Our workshop at the weekend was all about edible gardening in the greenest way possible. Biodiversity We think that if well managed, wildlife and edible gardening can coexist….